What to do when some one emails me saying they know my password

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What do when you get an email like this:

The below email is a well known scam and comes in many versions.
This is the text of this mail, including the grammatical and spelling errors.


Hello!

I am a hacker who has access to your operating system.
I also have full access to your account.

I’ve been watching you for a few months now.
The fact is that you were infected with malware through an adult site that you visited.

If you are not familiar with this, I will explain.
Trojan Virus gives me full access and control over a computer or other device.
This means that I can see everything on your screen, turn on the camera and microphone, but you do not know about it.

I also have access to all your contacts and all your correspondence.

Why your antivirus did not detect malware?
Answer: My malware uses the driver, I update its signatures every 4 hours so that your antivirus is silent.

I made a video showing how you satisfy yourself in the left half of the screen, and in the right half you see the video that you watched.
With one click of the mouse, I can send this video to all your emails and contacts on social networks.
I can also post access to all your e-mail correspondence and messengers that you use.

If you want to prevent this,
transfer the amount of $500 to my bitcoin address (if you do not know how to do this, write to Google: “Buy Bitcoin”).

My bitcoin address (BTC Wallet) is: 1P2xW3dAjbD5rz6H7Ej46puSS2Ep3Mh1uQ

After receiving the payment, I will delete the video and you will never hear me again.
I give you 50 hours (more than 2 days) to pay.
I have a notice reading this letter, and the timer will work when you see this letter.

Filing a complaint somewhere does not make sense because this email cannot be tracked like my bitcoin address.
I do not make any mistakes.

If I find that you have shared this message with someone else, the video will be immediately distributed.

Best regards!


Many web users have recently posted about a new blackmail scam that is actively spreading around the web via emails. The scam contains of a message, sent from an unknown sender, which pretends to be a hacker. The self-proclaimed hacker typically claims to have compromised the victim’s computer and to have accessed their password and contacts. It also claims that, with the help of a secretly inserted malware, the attacker has captured an embarrassing video and screenshots of the victim, and threatens to send them to all the stolen contacts if a certain amount of money is not being paid.

Is this threat real?
No, and don’t panic. This email is a scam that tries to trick you into thinking that your device or email has been hacked, then demands payment or else they will send compromising information -such as images of you captured through your web camera or your pornographic browsing history – to all your friends and family. And in classic ransomware fashion, there’s typically a ticking clock. Giving users a short time limit to deliver the payment is social engineering at its finest. This is a classic example of blackmail.

Threats, intimidation and high-pressure tactics are classic signs of a scam.

As you can imagine, this email and anything it states is just a scam to try and scare you into paying the ransom.

They have my password! How did they get my password?
To make the threats more credible, these scammers may include one of your passwords in this email. The scammers have your password from sites that were hacked, and in this case, likely matched up to a database of emails and stolen passwords and sent this scam out to potentially millions of people. You can check if your email or password was compromised in a data breach on Haveibeenpwned.

What steps should I take next? 

  1. Contact Live-Tech to request a professional PC Cleaning just to be safe
  2. Get Stop Spam today and put and end to these emails.

Threat Type Phishing, Scam, Social Engineering, Fraud
Fake Claim Criminals claim that they have humiliating material and attempt to blackmail victims.
Symptoms Unauthorized online purchases, changed online account passwords, identity theft, illegal access of the computer.
Distribution methods Deceptive emails, rogue online pop-up ads, search engine poisoning techniques, misspelled domains.
Damage Loss of sensitive private information, monetary loss, identity theft.